Knee Replacement By Body Mechanics

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Knee Replacement By Body Mechanics

Body mechanics is maintained by regular exercise to restore your knee strength and mobility and a gradual return to daily activities are important for your full recovery. Here is the best physical therapy for a knee replacement which was given by body mechanics. Your orthopedic surgeon and physical therapist can recommend that you exercise approximately 20 to 30 minutes two or three times a day and walk 30 minutes, two or three times a day during your early recovery. Your orthopaedist can suggest some of the following exercises. The following guide can help you better understand your exercise / activity program, supervised by your therapist and orthopedic surgeon.

Physical Therapy For A Knee Replacement:

Begin the following exercises as soon as you are able. You can start these in the recovery room after surgery. You may feel uncomfortable at first, but these exercises will help your recovery and actually lessen your postoperative pain.

Collapse the Quadriceps:

Squeeze the thigh muscle. Try to straighten the knee. Hold for 5 to 10 seconds. Perform this exercise approximately 10 times during 2 periods of one minute, relax one minute and repeat. Continue until the thigh feels exhausted.

Lift the Extended Leg:

Contract the thigh muscle with the knee fully extended on the bed, as in Tighten the Quadriceps. Lift the leg several inches. Hold for 5 to 10 seconds. Slowly lower it. Do it until your thigh feels exhausted. You can also lift your leg while sitting. Squeeze the thigh muscle completely and keep your knee fully extended with the leg unsupported. Realize it as above. Continue these exercises periodically until the strength returns to the thigh completely.

Pump with the Ankle –

Move the foot up and down rhythmically, contracting the muscles of the fibula and tibia. Perform this exercise periodically for 2 to 3 minutes, two or three times per hour in the recovery room. Continue this exercise until you recover fully and all the swelling of the ankle and lower leg has decreased.

Extended Knee Exercises:

Put a small towel rolled up on the heel so that the heel does not touch the bed. Squeeze the thigh. Try to fully extend the knee and touch the back of the knee to the bed. Keep the knee fully extended for 5 to 10 seconds. Do it until your thigh feels exhausted.

Bend the Knee with Bed Support:

Bend the knee as much as possible while sliding your foot on the bed. Keep the knee in a bent position as much as possible 10 seconds and then extend it. Repeat several times until the leg feels exhausted or until you can bend the knee completely.

Bend the Knee with Support While Sitting:

While sitting on the edge of the bed or in a chair with the thigh resting, put one foot behind the heel of the knee operated for support. Slowly bend the knee as much as possible. Keep the knee in this position for 5 to 10 seconds. Repeat several times until the leg feels exhausted or until you can bend the knee completely.

Bend the Knee Without Support While Sitting:

While sitting on the edge of the bed or in a chair with the thigh resting, bend the knee as much as possible until the foot rests on the floor. With your foot slightly on the floor, slide your upper body forward on the chair to increase the curve of the knee. Hold for 5 to 10 seconds. Extend the knee completely. Repeat several times until the leg feels exhausted or until you can bend the knee completely.

Early Activity

Soon after surgery, you will begin walking short distances in the hospital ward and perform daily activities. This early activity helps your recovery and helps the knee recover its strength and movement.

Walk:

Walking properly is the best way to help the knee recover. At the beginning, you will walk with a walker or crutches. The surgeon or therapist will advise you how much weight to put on your leg when walking.Stand comfortably with your equally balanced weight on the walker or crutches. Advance your walker or crutches a short distance; Then reach forward with your leg operated and the knee extended so that the heel of the foot touches the floor first. As you advance, the knee and ankle will bend and your entire foot will rest evenly on the floor. When you complete the step, the toe will rise off the floor and the knee and hip will bend so that you can reach the next step. Remember, touch your heel first, flatten your foot, and then lift your toes off the floor.

Walk as rhythmically and smoothly as you can. Keep calm. Adjust the length of your step and speed as necessary to walk at an even pace. By improving strength and muscular strength, you can spend more time walking. You will gradually put more weight on the leg. You can use a cane in the opposite hand to the surgery and eventually walk without support.

When you can walk and stand for more than 10 minutes and the knee is strong enough so that you do not carry any weight on the walker or crutches (often about 2 to 3 weeks after your surgery), you You can start using a single crutch or a cane. Take the support in the opposite hand next to the surgery. You should not limp or bend due to the operated knee.

Go up and down the ladder:

The ability to climb and descend the ladder requires strength and flexibility. At the beginning, you will need a handrail for support and will be able to do no more than one step at a time. Always climb the ladder with the good knee and lower the ladder with the operated knee. Remember, “up with the good” and “down with the bad.” You may want to have someone to help until you have regained most of your strength and mobility. Climbing the ladder is an optimal resistance and strengthening activity. Do not attempt to ascend a step higher than the standard height (7 inches) and always use a handrail to maintain balance. When you become stronger and more mobile, you can start ascending stairs, standing on your feet.

Advanced Activities and Exercises

Once you have regained independence for short distances and a few steps, you can increase your activity. The pain of your knee problems before surgery and the pain and swelling after surgery have weakened the knee. A full recovery will take many months. The following exercises and activities help you to fully recover.

Bending the Knee While Standing –

Stand with the help of a walker or crutches, raise your thigh and bend your knee as much as possible. Hold for 5 to 10 seconds. Then straighten the knee, touching the floor with the heel first. Repeat several times until it runs out.

Bend the Knee with Support –

Lying on your back, put a folded towel over your operated knee and drop the towel on your foot. Bend the knee and apply light pressure using the towel to increase the curve. Hold this position for 5 to 10 seconds. Repeat several times until it runs out.

Knee Exercises with Resistance –

You can put light weights around your ankle and repeat any of the exercises above. These resistance exercises can begin 4 to 6 weeks after your surgery. Use weights of one or two pesos first; gradually increase the weight when the strength returns. (Cheap ankle weights can be purchased with Velcro straps at most sports supply stores.)

Pedaling is an optimal activity to help you recover and strengthen the muscle and improve the mobility of the knee. At the beginning, adjust the height of the seat so that the bottom of the foot just touches the pedal with the knee almost straight. Pedal back to the beginning. Pedal forward only when a comfortable movement of cycling is possible by going backwards. As you become stronger (in 4 to 6 weeks) slowly increase the tension of the exercise bike. Pedalie 10 to 15 minutes twice a day, gradually increase to 20 to 30 minutes, three or four times a week.

Pedal:

Pedaling is an optimal activity to help you recover and strengthen the muscle and improve the mobility of the knee. At the beginning, adjust the height of the seat so that the bottom of the foot just touches the pedal with the knee almost straight. Pedal back to the beginning. Pedal forward only when a comfortable movement of cycling is possible by going backwards. As you become stronger (in 4 to 6 weeks) slowly increase the tension of the exercise bike. Pedalie 10 to 15 minutes twice a day, gradually increase to 20 to 30 minutes, three or four times a week.

Pain or Swelling after Exercise –

You may experience knee pain or swelling after exercise or other activity. You can alleviate this by elevating the leg and applying ice wrapped in a towel. Exercise and activity should improve their strength and mobility constantly. If you have any questions or problems, call your orthopedic surgeon or therapist.

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